The South African Bee Journal

The South African Bee Journal (SABJ) is a quarterly periodical published by SABIO and distributed to all paid up members of SABIO.

The beginning of the new decade brings with it the SABJ (The South African Bee Journal) in a new A4 format with the original name for reasons of continuity and branding. A new editorial team that consists of Robin Crewe, Hannelie Human, Tlou Masehela and Christian Pirk, prepared the final issue of the previous decade. The team is committed to bringing you a journal that is interesting and addresses the issues that are of importance to the South African Beekeeping community. This includes the beekeepers and the broader community that is dependent on pollination services and the development of livelihoods based on bee products. We will source material both locally and from the international beekeeping community so that the local industry is familiar with developments on a global scale.

We believe that even in the era of Google Groups, Facebook and Twitter there is still a place for the SABJ which provides a trusted source of information to SABIO members and also provides a long-term archive for the material that is published. Long term archives can be mined for information that may be intriguing and relevant in the future. Certainly, the archives of the SABJ provide a useful source of information on the development and growth of beekeeping in southern Africa.

The publication of the SABJ will not be possible without funding from our Advertisers who remains loyal supporters even in the difficult times that we are facing. Articles are written in either English or Afrikaans. Persons wishing to obtain a copy or contribute to the Journal should admit their requests, articles or advertorial to The Editor, SABJ, via e-mail to sabjeditor@gmail.com.

COLOSS survey – Sources of information (South Africa)

The survey is produced by COLOSS (www.coloss.org) – an international organisation and network of beekeeping scientists and advisers. The mission of COLOSS is to improve the well-being of honey bees at a global level. There are several networks within COLOSS. One network is the B-RAP (Bridging Research and Practice) group, which aims to connect science and the advisory work with beekeepers’ daily work.

The aim of this survey is to analyse how researchers and advisers can best support you as a beekeeper. In order to do this, we ask: How did you start beekeeping? What beekeeping education do you have? What kind of beekeeping networks do you have? How do you get information? What kind of training do you want? What are the biggest challenges you face as a beekeeper? And where do you think focus should be in the future?
We will use the results of this survey to prioritise out extension and scientific work. This survey will be conducted in more than 25 countries worldwide.

https://www.bee-survey.com/index.php/714781?newtest=Y&lang=en

 

BRAP

SABIO MembershipThe NAMC Report

Following a request originating from the beekeeping industry in 2006 to government for an investigation into the bee industry, a Committee under the auspices of the National Agricultural Marketing Council, NAMC, was established in 2007 in terms of section 7 of the Marketing of Agricultural Products Act.

The purpose of this Committee was to investigate the current structure of the beekeeping industry in South Africa, the constraints and challenges facing the industry and to make recommendations to the NAMC, the Minister of Agriculture and the beekeeping industry bodies regarding the future development of the industry. Its additional purpose was to serve as a platform for further discussions and liaison between the industry and government. The Report was finalised in 2008.